Lensed Fiber Arrays

Our lensed fiber arrays (LFAs) are v-groove optical fiber arrays with 3D printed lenses at the ends of the fibers. They are intended for free space coupling to other fiber arrays, photonic integrated circuits (PICs), or other components. The printed microlenses can focus or collimate the light from the fibers, enabling mode field conversion or coupling over larger distances.

collimated light from lensed fiber array

The high-precision 3D printing of lenses is a collaboration with the German based company Nanoscribe. This additive manufacturing process offers many advantages over traditional, subtractive, methods of creating lensed or tapered fibers, such as:

  • High positioning accuracy relative to the fiber core
  • Full control over lens design parameters, such as asphericity for aberration correction
  • The ability to print directly onto existing surfaces, enabling more options for light coupling

We have several lensed fiber arrays available in stock and can make custom configurations for you.

3D printed lensed fiber array

Configure your lensed fiber array

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Features

  • 3D-printed polymer lenses (up to 250 μm in height)
  • Mode field reduction or beam collimation
  • Wavelengths ranging from visible to mid-infrared
  • Polarization maintaining, horizontal or vertical
  • 127 or 250 pitch
  • 1 up to 32 fibers, several fiber lengths
  • FC, LC or MPO connector interface
  • UPC or APC connector polishing style

Benefits

  • Perfect for PIC characterization or free space operation
  • Accurate core pitch position
  • Customized solutions available
  • Compact design
  • Periscopic mirror design available for wafer-level PIC testing

“We have a great collaboration with PHIX. As we help PHIX expand their product offering with 3D-printed freeform microlenses, they open up a new market for us and give us valuable feedback on future market requirements.” – Jörg Smolenski (Nanoscribe)

lensed fiber coupling to chip
microlens array 3D-printed on a chip grating